POLITICS OF EAST ASIA
POLITICAL SCIENCE 545 & 645

Thursday 5:30-8:20pm

Dr. Dennis V. Hickey
Tel: 836-5850
Spring 2014
Office: STRO 325
Office. Hours:   Wednesday 1:00-3:00; and Thursday 1:30-3:30.
Email: 
dennishickey@missouristate.edu
Professor's Homepage:  http://courses.missouristate.edu/DennisHickey/hickey.htm
Useful Links Page:  http://courses.missouristate.edu/DennisHickey/useful%20links.htm

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the political and economic systems of contemporary East Asia. Primary emphasis is placed upon the People's Republic of China, the Republic of China (Taiwan), Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, Vietnam and the two Koreas. The class will provide students with an understanding of the ideologies and strategies pursued by these governments as well as an appreciation of contemporary economic, political and strategic issues in the region.  As such, it promotes the university’s mission in public affairs by enhancing and promoting the cultural competence of MSU students.

 

APPROACH TO COURSE:

 

This course adopts a country-by-country approach to the politics of East Asia. However, students should not consider each country as an isolated case or "discrete experience." Some issues might well be unique to a particular country. But many others transcend national borders (for example, population pressures, economic development strategies, pollution, health issues, proliferation and so forth). Furthermore, students should adopt a comparative approach when studying such topics as economic development, political modernization, etc.

 

STUDY ABROAD OPPORTUNITIES & LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION:

 

Students are advised that MSU provides opportunities for students to spend an entire semester taking classes in the People's Republic of China at Qingdao University. Like MSU, Qingdao University enrolls close to 20,000 students. Qingdao is located on the ocean and also is fairly close to Beijing--China's capital. Moreover, the graduate program in Global Studies at MSU has an exchange agreement with Renmin (People’s) University in Beijing, China. See Dr. Hickey for more information. Finally, remember that classes in Mandarin Chinese and Japanese are available at MSU. For more information, please contact the Department of Modern and Classical Languages.

 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

In addition to the web based readings, students must purchase the following three titles from the MSU bookstore:

 

EXAMINATIONS:

 

3 examinations (format may vary, but probably short answer/definition & essay) including a final that covers material on Japan, Singapore and Vietnam. Each student will take his/her examination on the scheduled examination day (see below). Be sure to bring a blue book to class with you on examination day. In order to prepare for examinations, attend class, take notes and read the texts. Academic dishonesty (cheating) is not tolerated and may result in a grade of “F” for an examination or the entire semester. For more information, see below. If a student misses an examination, s/he must contact the professor by telephone (836-5850) and provide a valid (and documented) excuse within 24 hours of the scheduled exam.  Depending upon the circumstances, a make-up exam may be scheduled.

 

MAKEUP EXAMS:

 

As described above, there will be no make-ups for unexcused absences. In the event that you miss an exam, you must contact the professor within 24 hours to arrange a make-up (phone 836-5850 and leave a message where you can be reached if I am not in the office). Email may also be used, but use the function requiring a receipt. Unless you are lost somewhere in the Nevada desert, you or someone else should be able to reach a telephone and contact me. And note that there will be no make-ups for make-ups.

 

ATTENDANCE:

 

As this class/seminar meets only once per week, attendance is critically important. Missing one class is the equivalent of missing an entire week of classes. And be forewarned--some questions on the exams may be from material NOT covered in your texts.

 

RESEARCH PAPER:

 

1. Scope: Students will be required to write a research paper. Approaches, methodologies and topics will vary. For example, a student may wish to write a policy paper. Another might adopt a more theoretical approach. Irrespective of approach, however, ALL topics must be approved by the instructor no later than February 27, 2014.  Be forewarned that plagiarism is cheating and may result in a grade of “F” for the paper and the course. Some possible topics are provided below. Note that these are only examples.

 

2. Requirements for Undergraduate Students: 10-20 pages (excluding endnotes & bibliography), type-written, double spaced, fifteen outside sources (beyond assigned readings in class). Papers are due no later than the beginning of our class meeting on April 24, 2014 (five points deducted for each day late--April 25 will be counted as the first penalty day—and the maximum penalty to be deducted is 25 points). Students will submit two copies of their research paper. A "marked-up" copy will be returned during the final examination.  Please do not ask for your paper to be returned early.

3. Warning: Begin your project ASAP. Do not wait until April to learn that you have to wait for inter-library loan materials. This is not an excuse for a substandard research paper. And always make a "back-up" file when using a computer. "Losing" your work on a computer is never an acceptable excuse.

4. Research Facilities at MSU Missouri State University is a multipurpose, metropolitan university serving over 23,000 students.   In 1995, Missouri lawmakers approved legislation providing this institution with a statewide mission in public affairs and it is the only university in the state with such a mission.  As might be expected, the university's research facilities in this area are unsurpassed in Missouri.  For example, in the area of Asian politics, MSU subscribes to more scholarly journals than any other university that I have visited in Kansas, Missouri and Arkansas. Library holdings include Asian Affairs, Asian Survey, Issues & Studies, Journal of Contemporary China, Journal of Asian Studies, East Asia and the list goes on and on.  In the area of electronic resources, the library subscribes to Lexis/Nexis. You might also wish to take advantage of the materials available from the “useful links” website on my homepage. With respect to books, our library's holdings are particularly strong in the areas of East Asian Security and the politics of China, Taiwan and Japan as I have consistently ordered books in this area and have obtained external support to bolster the library’s holdings. In short, there is no reason for a student in this class to submit a poorly researched paper. 

 

PLUS AND MINUS GRADING:

 

MSU switched to the “plus and minus” grading system several years ago.  The system used in this class is as follows:

 

93-99% A
90-92% A-
87-89% B+
83-86% B
80-82% B-
77-79% C+
73-76% C
70-72% C-
67-69% D+
60-66% D

 

GRADES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS:

 

Your final grade will be based upon examination scores (roughly 25% each) and the research paper (roughly 25%). But being unprepared and/or failing to attend class may lower your grade. Most students should expect a breakdown which approximates the following:

EXAM I: 25%

EXAM II: 25%

FINAL EXAM: 25%

PAPER: 25%

 

GRADUATE STUDENT DISCUSSION LEADERS:

 

From time to time, graduate students will be expected to summarize readings and lead class discussion.  The instructor will appoint discussion leaders. The graduate student should prepare a short talk outlining the major points of the article and distribute a short handout to students and the professor. A power-point presentation is acceptable. Undergraduates are encouraged to ask penetrating questions!!!

 

 

NON DISCRIMINATION STATMENT:

Missouri State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution, and maintains a grievance procedure available to any person who believes he or she has been discriminated against. At all times, it is your right to address inquiries or concerns about possible discrimination to the Office for Equity and Diversity, Park Central Office Building, 117 Park Central Square, Suite 111, (417) 836-4252. Other types of concerns (i.e., concerns of an academic nature) should be discussed directly with your instructor and can also be brought to the attention of your instructor’s Department Head.   Please visit the OED website at www.missouristate.edu/equity/.

DISABILITY ACCOMODATION:

To request academic accommodations for a disability, contact the Director of Disability Services, Plaster Student Union, Suite 405, (417) 836-4192 or (417) 836-6792 (TTY), www.missouristate.edu/disability.  Students are required to provide documentation of disability to Disability Services prior to receiving accommodations. Disability Services refers some types of accommodation requests to the Learning Diagnostic Clinic, which also provides diagnostic testing for learning and psychological disabilities. For information about testing, contact the Director of the Learning Diagnostic Clinic, (417) 836-4787, http://psychology.missouristate.edu/ldc.

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY: 

Missouri State University is a community of scholars committed to developing educated persons who accept the responsibility to practice personal and academic integrity.  You are responsible for knowing and following the university’s student honor code, Student Academic Integrity Policies and Procedures, available at www.missouristate.edu/assets/provost/AcademicIntegrityPolicyRev-1-08.pdf and also available at the Reserves Desk in Meyer Library.  Any student participating in any form of academic dishonesty will be subject to sanctions as described in this policy.   Plagiarism on your paper could earn you a failing grade on the project and/or in the seminar.

DROPPING THE CLASS:

 

 It is your responsibility to understand the University’s procedure for dropping a class. If you stop attending this class but do not follow proper procedure for dropping the class, you will receive a failing grade and will also be financially obligated to pay for the class. For information about dropping a class or withdrawing from the university, contact the Office of the Registrar at 836-5520.

 

CELL PHONES, PAGERS, ETC: 

 

As a member of the learning community, each student has a responsibility to other students who are members of the community.  When cell phones or pagers ring and students respond in class or leave class to respond, it disrupts the class.  Therefore, the Office of the Provost prohibits the use by students of cell phones, pagers, PDAs, or similar communication devices during scheduled classes.  All such devices must be turned off or put in a silent (vibrate) mode and ordinarily should not be taken out during class.  Given the fact that these same communication devices are an integral part of the University’s emergency notification system, an exception to this policy would occur when numerous devices activate simultaneously.  When this occurs, students may consult their devices to determine if a university emergency exists.  If that is not the case, the devices should be immediately returned to silent mode and put away.  Other exceptions to this policy may be granted at the discretion of the instructor.  For example, Dr. Hickey will make allowances for a sick child or immediate relative, pregnancy, and so forth. Discuss your situation with him.

 

EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYLLABI STATEMENT: 

Students who require assistance during an emergency evacuation must discuss their needs with their professors and Disability Services. If you have emergency medical information to share with me, or if you need special arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as possible.  For additional information students should contact the Office of Disability Services, 836-4192 (PSU 405), or Larry Combs, Interim Assistant Director of Public Safety and Transportation at 836-6576.  For further information on Missouri State University’s Emergency Response Plan, please refer to the following web site: http://www.missouristate.edu/safetran/erp.htm.

 

SHOWING PROPER RESPECT FOR OTHERS IN THE CLASSROOM:

 Please do not arrive late for class or leave class early.  If you talk, annoy your neighbors or engage in other disruptive activity during the lecture period, you will be asked to leave.  If one of your classmates engages in disruptive activity, bring it to the attention of the instructor--do NOT wait until the end of the semester.  And, if you are too tired to stay awake in class, you should be home in bed. Texting, playing on Facebook and such is always fine—but do it out in the hall or at home.  What about cell phones, pagers and such? See comments above.

 

CLASS SCHEDULE: 

 

A class schedule follows.  Please note, however, that this schedule (including examination dates) is subject to change.  For example, cataclysmic world events (turmoil in western China, a bigger war in the Middle East, snow in Springfield, etc.) and/or class discussion may necessitate a change in the schedule.  In this respect, attendance may be of critical importance--all changes in schedule will be announced in class.  Also, there is a good chance that we will have a featured speaker or two during the semester—perhaps more.  This will necessitate a change in our schedule.

 

 

 

 

 

CLASS SCHEDULE

 

WEEK ONEJanuary 16, 2014

TOPICS: INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIA (AND INTRODUCTION TO CHINA--TIME PERMITTING)

REQUIRED READINGS:

(1). "The Pacific Rim: Diversity and Interconnection" in Global Studies, Japan and the Pacific Rim, Eleventh  Edition (Guilford, CT:  Dushkin/McGraw Hill, 2013), pp.2-16.

(2) Louis D. Hayes, Political Systems of East Asia:  China, Korea, and Japan. Introduction and Chapter 1.

 

PART I:  P.R. OF CHINA AND HONG KONG, S.A.R.

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WEEK TWO: January 23, 2014

 TOPICS: China: History, People, Economy

REQUIRED READINGS:

(1)China Country Report in Global Studies, Japan and the Pacific Rim, Eleventh Edition, pp.66-79

(2) China Country Report in Global Studies, China, 14th   Edition, pp.4--48.

(3) Louis D. Hayes, Political Systems of East Asia:  China, Korea, and Japan, Chapters 2, 3 4 and 5.

 (4) Dennis V. Hickey, "Returning to Teach in China," THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, November 5, 2008 will be emailed to students.

(5) Dennis V. Hickey, “The Roots of Chinese Xenophobia,” The World & I, July 2002, pp.26-31 (article will be emailed to students)

FILM:    MAO

VIEW:    CULTURAL REVOLUTION POSTER PAGE

 

CULTURAL REVOLUTION POSTER PAGE

WEEK THREEJanuary 30, 2014

TOPICS: China Today: Politics and Security

REQUIRED READINGS:

(1)   Louis D. Hayes, Political Systems of East Asia:  China, Korea, and Japan, Chapter 5 and 6

(2)    “Think Again: China” Article 1 in China, 14th  Edition

(3)   “Think Again: China’s Military” Article 2 in China, 14th  Edition

(4)   “China Will Not be the World’s Deputy Sheriff” Article 22 in China, 14th Edition

(5)   China Extends Trade with Iran,” Article 23 in China, 14th  Edition

(6)   Africa Builds as Beijing Scrambles to Invest,” Article 24 in China 14th Edition.

(7)   “A New China Requires a New US Strategy,” Article 25 in China 14th Edition

(8)   Dennis V. Hickey, “Sino-US Ties,” China Daily, December 6, 2011 on the world wide web at:

 http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/opinion/2011-12/06/content_14217624.htm

 

 

WEEK FOUR: February 6, 2014

TOPICS: Chinese Society

Also, Hong Kong: S.A.R. of PRC

REQUIRED READINGS:

(1)   “Is China Afraid of Its Own People,” Article 5 in China, 14th Edition

(2)   “Mania on the Mainland,” Article 15 in China, 14th Edition

(3)   “Chinese Acquire Taste for French Wine,” Article 19 in China, 14th Edition

(4)   "More than just Income Gap to Bridge," CHINA DAILY, January 27, 2010, p. A9 [co-authored with Takashi Kawamoto on the world wide web at:
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/opinion/2010-01/27/content_9382086.htm

(5)   Hong Kong in China, 14th Edition, pp.49-70 and Hong Kong in Japan Eleventh Edition pp. 86-95.

 

WEEK FIVE: February 13, 2014

TOPICS:  Wrap of Hong Kong and Film on PRC

 

WEEK SIX:  February 20, 2014

 

TEST NUMBER ONE COVERING INTRODUCTION,  CHINA & HONG KONG (two hours allowed). BRING BLUE BOOK TO CLASS! THE EXAM WILL BE CONDUCTED BETWEEN 5:30 and 7:30 pm.

 

WEEK SIX CONTINUED:

FILM: A short film on Taiwan may be viewed (precise title to be announced in class) after the examination.

 

 PART II: TAIWAN (R.O.C.) & the KOREAS
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WEEK SEVEN: February 27, 2014

 

TOPICS: Introduction to Taiwan

REQUIRED READING :

(1)   Taiwan Country Report” in China, 14th Edition

(2)   "Taiwan Country Report" in Japan and the Pacific Rim, Eleventh Edition

(3)   "Breathing Easier on Taiwan: Ma Ying-jeou's Reelection Lowers the Chances for New Tensions with Mainland China," THE LOS ANGELES TIMES, January 17, 2012, p.A13. On the world wide web at:

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jan/17/opinion/la-oe-hickey-taiwan-20120117

 

WEEK EIGHT  March 6, 2014

TOPICS:  Taiwan’s Relations with the Chinese Mainland and the USA,

REQUIRED READING:
(1) Dennis V. Hickey, "Wake Up to Reality: Taiwan, the Chinese Mainland and Peace Across the Taiwan Strait," THE JOURNAL OF CHINESE POLITICAL SCIENCE,  Volume 18, No. 1, Spring 2013, pp.1-20. A PDF file will be emailed to Students

(2)  Dennis V. Hickey, "Imbalance in the Taiwan Strait,"   PARAMETERS:  THE US ARMY WAR COLLEGE QUARTERLY,  Volume 43, Number 3, Autumn 2013, pp.43-53, on the world wide web at http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/parameters/
(3)
“Taiwan Jet Deal,” Article 14 in Japan and the Pacific Rim, Eleventh Edition.

(4)   Dennis V. Hickey, “US Should Support East China Sea Initiative,” Taipei Times, November 14, 2012 on the world wide web at:

http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/editorials/archives/2012/11/14/2003547626

 

WEEK NINE: March 13, 2014

NO CLASS (SPRING BREAK)

 

WEEK TEN:  March 20, 2014

TOPICS: Republic of Korea (South Korea)
REQUIRED READINGS
(1)
Louis D. Hayes, Political Systems of East Asia:  China, Korea, and Japan, Chapter 7-10 and 12.
(2)
South Korea” in Japan and the Pacific Rim. Eleventh Edition

(3)The Korean Peninsula on the Verge,” Article 13 in Japan and the Pacific Rim, Eleventh Edition

 

WEEK ELEVEN: March 27, 2014

TOPICS:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK)

REQUIRED READINGS
(1)
Louis D. Hayes, Political Systems of East Asia:  China, Korea, and Japan, Chapter 11.

(2) “North Korea,” Article 13 in Japan and the Pacific Rim, Eleventh Edition.

(3) More articles will be emailed to students

 

WEEK TWELVE: April 3, 2014  TEST NUMBER TWO COVERING TAIWAN AND THE KOREAS (two hours allowed). BRING BLUE BOOK TO CLASS!

 

WEEK TWELVE CONTINUED:

FILM: A short film on Japan may be viewed (precise title to be announced in class) after the examination.

 

 PART III: JAPAN, SINGAPORE & VIETNAM
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WEEK THIRTEEN: April 10, 2014

TOPICS:  INTRODUCTION TO JAPAN & THE ECONOMIC MIRACLE

REQUIRED READINGS:

(1) Louis D. Hayes, Political Systems of East Asia:  China, Korea, and Japan, Chapters 13, 14, 15 and 16.
(2)"Japan” in  Japan and the Pacific Rim,

 

  

WEEK FOURTEENApril 17, 2014 NO CLASS, SPRING HOLIDAY

 

 

WEEK FIFTEEN: April 24, 2014

TOPICS:  JAPAN:  INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND DEFENSE

REQUIRED READINGS

(1) Louis D. Hayes, Political Systems of East Asia:  China, Korea, and Japan, Chapters 17 and 18,

(2) Dennis V. Hickey and Lilly Kelan Lu, "Japan's Military Modernization:  The Chinese Perspective," in James C. Hsiung (editor), CHINA AND JAPAN AT ODDS:  DECIPHERING THE PERPETUAL CONFLICT, New York:  Palgrave-MacMillan Publishers, 2007  This Article will be emailed to Students.

(3) “In Japan, New Nationalism Takes Hold,” Chapter 9 in Japan and the Pacific Rim

Other readings will be emailed to students.

 

WEEK SIXTEENMay 1, 2014

TOPICS:  SINGAPORE & VIETNAM

REQUIRED READINGS

(1)    Singapore Country Report in  in  Japan and the Pacific Rim,

(2) Vietnam Country Report in Japan and the Pacific Rim

(3) “The Vietnam Case,” in Japan and the Pacific Rim.

(4) Other readings on Vietnam and Singapore will be emailed to students

 

WEEK SEVENTEEN:  May 8, 2014
Course Wrap up or Catch Up (more likely a ‘catch up’ as we often fall behind schedule)

 

FINAL EXAMMAY 15, 2014 AT 5:45 P.M COVERING JAPAN, SINGAPORE & VIETNAM (two hours allowed). BRING BLUE BOOK TO CLASS.  GRADED TERM PAPERS WILL BE RETURNED DURING THE FINAL.

Miscellaneous Information

January 13:  Spring Classes Begin

February 20: Exam One

March 10-16: Spring Break (no class on March 13)

April 3: Exam Two

April 11: Last Day to Drop

April 17-20: Spring Holiday (no class on April 17)

April 24: Papers Due

May 9:  No Classes (Study Day)

May 15: Final Exam

 

 

RETURN TO DR.DENNIS HICKEY'S HOMEPAGE